An Apathetic Society

We in this county are privileged and perhaps, at this point in history, too privileged. In the era of modern convenience, we are conditioned to expect maximum results in minimal time and with minimal effort. Perhaps then this explains the political climate, or lack thereof, in modern society. We expect the government to care for our every need and as long as we have ours, we really don’t care how it is that we came by it. We don’t care if our politicians are honest, as long as they keep the government largess flowing. As we have seen in recent congressional hearings, a politician can repeatedly lie under oath with no fear of repercussion or public outrage. The ugly truth is that we simply don’t care. Our apathy is so deep seated and ingrained that we care more about the outcome of a video game than our next election cycle. The same people who will wait for days in the cold camped outside a store for the latest smartphone can’t be bothered with the mundane task of voting. We’ve all heard the excuses whether it be “I was out of town” or “It was raining that day”, no excuse is outside of the realm of possibilities. The truth of the matter is that we are more concerned about what we’re going to have for our next meal than who will become our next president.

We’ve all seen the person on the street interviews where average people are asked ridiculously simple political questions and none of those interviewed seem to have a clue how the country operates much less who’s in charge of the operation. While I understand that the clips are edited for maximum effect, the fact remains that, at least in my small part of the world, most people can’t even tell you who the Vice President is much less explain the intricacies of the tenth amendment of the constitution.

How have we arrived at this point in history when personal apathy has trumped personal responsibility and personal comfort has displaced the rugged individualism of our forefathers. Today, our children are being taught Globalism instead of national pride, inclusivity has replaced outstanding performance and heightened sensitivity has been placed on a pedestal above standing on principle. People are simply afraid to speak out. If you disagree with a lifestyle choice, you’re phobic and insensitive, if you disagree with the present immigrant policy or any of the myriad of minority movements, you must be a racist bigot. It seems that here is no shortage of groups clamoring to be the next class of people who are oppressed. At some point, we become so laden with guilt and shame that many simply throw up their hands and give up, hence, enter the aforementioned apathy.

This is the epitome of Alinsky’s Rules for Radicals. Divisiveness is the rule of the day. Opposition has become the enemy of the community. We have a President in the Whitehouse who could only boast of his accomplishments as a community organizer prior to his senatorial run. One would be hard pressed to deny that we are living in Alinsky’s dream world. Apathy has become the path of least resistance. It is easier to stand in the shadows and do nothing than to stand in the spotlight and expose oneself to ridicule. In the words of Bonhoeffer, “Silence in the face of evil is itself evil. God will not hold us guiltless. Not to speak is to speak. Not to act is to act.” Oh, did I just call the modern progressive class evil? Let us not forget the infamous words of their mentor Saul Alinsky, “Lest we forget at least an over-the-shoulder acknowledgment to the very first radical: from all our legends, mythology, and history (and who is to know where mythology leaves off and history begins — or which is which), the first radical known to man who rebelled against the establishment and did it so effectively that he at least won his own kingdom — Lucifer.” (emphasis mine).

Until we as a society can generate the amount of spinal stiffness required to stand against the outrageous behavior of the progressives in this country, we really must admit that we deserve what we get.

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