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  It's Time for the Silent Majority to Speak Out
by Bobby Eberle, GOPUSA.com
25
March 2003

Free speech is great until it hurts the bottom line.  With a a slowing of record sales or a dip in the Neilsen ratings, executives who normally let their "stars" run amok will undoubtedly rein them in.

Putting up with the inane comments from the Hollywood left may seem overwhelming at times. After all, we are told by the likes of Martin Sheen, Janeane Garofalo, and Mike Farrell that Saddam Hussein is not a threat to us or his neighbors. We are told that inspections can work. From their gas-guzzling limos, we are told that this is a war for oil. Now, Nashville has stepped in, through the mouth of Natalie Maines of the Dixie Chicks, to lend its "influence" to the debate, and many Americans are left wondering, "What's next?"
 
Overwhelming? Yes. Hopeless? No. For the ultimate voice of influence in America is that of the American people. It's time for the silent majority to clear its throat and let its voice be heard.
 
The Hollywood elites have plenty of resources to throw around, but the voices of ordinary Americans contain the real power. Yes, leftist actors can get on the air and tell us that President Bush is moving unilaterally against Iraq, but the American majority can tell these actors that they are wrong. The American majority can hit these out-of-touch celebrities where they live -- in their pocketbooks.
 
Boycotts and rallies work, and it's time for the American majority to get active and let the celebrities know that America is not on their side. The actions of the "silent majority" are slowly starting to show results, but more needs to be done. An ongoing petition of Americans voicing their displeasure with celebrity "pundits" has gathered close to 100,000 signatures. Through the actions of concerned listeners, many radio stations have stopped playing music by the Dixie Chicks.
 
People talk about boycotting French goods, and we definitely should. We should also be vocal about what we are doing. The media, Hollywood, and now Nashville need to learn that we're not going to take it any more. If there is a rally in your area, participate in it. If there is a petition or rally on the Internet, sign up for it. Americans should call radio stations and ask them to pull music of misinformed Bush-bashers. Americans should also boycott television shows and movies starring these actors who claim that Bush and the United States are a bigger threat to world peace than Saddam Hussein and Iraq.
 
With a dip in Neilsen ratings or a slowing of record sales, executives who normally let their "stars" run amok will undoubtedly rein them in. Free speech is great until it hurts the bottom line. When the bottom line is hurt, executives have an obligation to bring the "hammer" down and get these celebrities to back off.
 
The thoughts, ideas, and sentiments of ordinary Americans often go unnoticed. Ordinary Americans go to work, pay their bills, and look out for the well-being of their families. Some are politically active, but most are not. Most do not consider activism as part of their daily routine. Activities such as rallies, petition drives, and boycotts do not usually occupy a place on their "to do" lists. Yet these are different times, and with different times, come different measures.
 
It's not enough for ordinary Americans to simply go about their business and say "leave me alone." Those days appear to be over. In order to counter the money and fame that celebrities bring with them in their arsenal, American citizens must fight back through the sheer power of their will and their collective voice.
 
Together we can show the Hollywood elites that their views are not our views. Together, we can send a message to entertainment executives that we don't love their shows and love their music so much that we will turn a blind eye to the behavior of their employees. There are times in American history when it becomes necessary for the "silent majority" to speak out. Now is one of those times.

Bobby Eberle is President and CEO of GOPUSA (www.GOPUSA.com), a news, information, and commentary company based in Houston, TX. He holds a Ph.D. in mechanical engineering from Rice University.

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