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  How Many More Lies Lie Ahead?
by Edward L. Daley, The Bodacious Post
25 July
2003Democrats

The claim that Saddam had attempted to purchase uranium from Africa was NOT proven to have been false a year ago and it still hasn't been!




A new DNC hit piece in the form of a television campaign ad relates the following information in typewritten words across the screen. "In his State of the Union address George W. Bush told us of an imminent threat..."

Right off the bat we are confronted with one huge whopper of a lie, because George W. Bush never mentioned an "imminent threat" posed by Iraq at any time during his State of the Union (S.O.U.) address. In fact, the foundation of the Bush doctrine of preemptive strikes is that we should undertake them BEFORE an enemy's threat becomes imminent.

The above typewritten words are followed by a clip from the S.O.U. address of the President saying "Saddam Hussein recently sought significant quantities of uranium from Africa." After that the following words appear. "America took him at his word."

The short clip from Bush's speech begins immediately after he has said the words, "The British government has learned that..." The omission of those six words is intentional, because the Democrats know that Mr. Bush's statement was not only NOT deceptive, it was a fact! The British did indeed have intelligence which showed that the Iraqis had attempted to purchase uranium from Africa, a claim which they stand by to this day. The Democrats' claim that "America" took George W. Bush at his word on this issue is also not true. Millions of Americans, particularly liberals, did not believe anything that the President was saying at the time, let alone these few words, so the implied message, that they as well as all other Americans were somehow duped into believing him, is also false. The entire Democratic party was in complete denial about the Iraq situation from the word go, and they failed to admit that Bush was correct about even the most obvious truths in the months leading up to the war.


The ad continues with the words, "But now we find out that it wasn't true," along with what looks to be a headline torn from a New York Times press clipping dated July 8, 2003, and stating "White House says Iraq claim was flawed."

That, of course, is also a lie. We've found out no such thing and the leaders of the DNC know it full well. Furthermore, I went to the Times web-site and did a search for that headline, then I browsed every one which they listed for July of this year. I couldn't find it. However, I did find references to other related stories which were published on or about that date.

One which was published on the 8th had the headline "Bush Claim on Iraq Had Flawed Origin, White House Says." In the story, the author, David E, Sanger, claims that "Bush relied on incomplete and perhaps inaccurate information from American intelligence agencies when he declared, in State of Union speech, that Saddam Hussein tried to purchase uranium from Africa," stating that the White House's acknowledgment came shortly after a Times op-ed, written by former ambassador Joseph C. Wilson IV, was printed on July 6. The op-ed being referred to was entitled "What I didn't find in Africa." Sanger makes the previous statement regarding the S.O.U. address twice within the first few paragraphs of his article, yet doesn't bother to quote the words that the President actually used when he referred to Iraq's alleged attempt to purchase uranium from Africa. He also makes no mention of the fact that the President identified the British government as the source of the intelligence he was referring to.

Is it any wonder that a recent Rasmussen poll has found that only 46% of the American people believe the New York Times?

But I digress.

By any means, the DNC's Bush bashing continues with the words "A year earlier, that claim was already proven to be false."

The claim that Saddam had attempted to purchase uranium from Africa was NOT proven to have been false a year ago and it still hasn't been! What was made clear by the Bush administration itself, before this story got recycled during Bush's recent Africa trip, was that the CIA's intelligence concerning attempted uranium purchases by Saddam from Niger included a report which was later proved to have been a forgery. That was nothing new to any news aficionado when the Democrats decided to invent this "scandal" two weeks ago. Both the British and U.S. governments knew about it and openly admitted such. I remember hearing about the Niger forgeries after the International Atomic Energy Agency identified them in a report to the U.N. Security Council in early March, before the Iraq War began.

The ad then goes on to include three more statements which are apparently attributed to the New York Times and NBC News, although in what fashion exactly is left unexplained.
"The CIA knew it. [New York Times, 7/6/03]"
"The State Department knew it. [New York Times, 7/6/03]"
"The White House knew it. [NBC News, 6/26/03]"
Then the words "But he told us anyway" appear.

Of course, none of this matters at all when one considers that what those entities knew about an admittedly false document is exactly what everyone else who was paying attention knew long before now, and it still has nothing whatsoever to do with the President's statements during the State of the Union address.

It's at this point where the Democrats' ad really becomes absurd, because the same incomplete quote, which has been taken entirely out of its true context, is now repeated as if using it again at this point will somehow make more sense than it did at the beginning of the ad. Somebody should have told the producers that it makes no sense regardless of how many times they use it.

The ad ends astonishingly enough with the words "It's time to tell the truth" being typed across the screen. I actually laughed out loud when I saw them. They were followed by "Help hold George W. Bush accountable by calling for an independent, bipartisan investigation. Go to www.democrats.org/truth to sign the petition and make your voice heard. Because America deserves the truth."

America does indeed deserve the truth as often as it can get it.  Unfortunately the people calling for that truth now are among the most untruthful, hypocritical and remarkably dishonorable human beings I have ever had the displeasure of writing about.

Email Edward L. Daley


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