Debunking Planned Parenthood’s (false) Attacks on Cruz

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Planned Parenthood took to social media recently with a meme attacking the pro-life record of Ted Cruz.  The notation above this meme reads “So, let’s get this straight: Sen. Ted Cruz—the guy who wants to restrict women’s rights and healthcare, opposes policies that support families’ economic security, and once shut down the government to take away health care from millions of people—wants to be president?  No Thanks.”

There are many fallacies in the above statement.  Too many to focus on for just one opinion piece (there is an entire book that can be written refuting the above false statements) but let us focus on one statement in the body of the meme.  This particular statement reads “Applauded the Hobby Lobby decision, letting bosses deny women birth control coverage.”

Anyone who followed the Hobby Lobby case (Burwell v. Hobby Lobby) knows the case was about abortifacients, not birth control.  Hobby Lobby, at the time of this decision, covered sixteen forms of contraception for their employees.  Thus, this meme line by Planned Parenthood is simply not true. 

However, for the purposes of this opinion piece, ignoring the drastic difference between abortifacients and birth control, there is a larger leftist narrative here that needs to be debunked.  The narrative that Ted Cruz, or any politician who is pro-life, is anti-woman indeed needs to be refuted.

There is a truth in the pro-life/pro-choice argument that leftists don’t seem, or want, to understand.  Leftist female pro-abortion activists such as Cecile Richards (President of Planned Parenthood of America) are not representative of the entire gender.  Not all females believe in the mission of Planned Parenthood.  Not all females believe in abortion.  This may come as a shock to pro-abortionists, but it is true.

I was in South Carolina this weekend volunteering for the Cruz campaign.  A couple was volunteering, overseeing the stay of out-of-town volunteers.  One of which was a female.  Of the three paid Cruz campaign staff I met at the state office in which I worked, two of the staff members were female.  There were four females working the phones for Cruz when I was at the office one of which was an evangelical. 

While volunteering, I met a passionate, incredibly intelligent young woman who was volunteering as well.  This lady was a recent college graduate on her way to law school.  When I asked her why Cruz instead of any other she specifically mentioned as one of her reasons for support Cruz’s unwavering pro-life stance. 

Until recently, I sat on the Respect Life committee at my church which happens to be one of the largest Catholic churches in Cincinnati.  The leader of this pro-life group was a woman.  At least half, if not the majority, of participants on this committee were women. 

When examining the national leaders of the pro-life movement, there are women at the forefront.  Lila Rose, Alveda King (niece of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.), and Marjorie Jones Dannenfelser come to mind.  Norma McCovey, the Roe of the landmark Roe v. Wade case, is also a national pro-life leader.  McCorvey and King both had abortions.  Now they are active in the pro-life movement because they know firsthand the personal/psychological damage abortions cause women.  Outside of these grassroots leaders there are many female legislators who are pro-life, too many list in this piece.

Ted Cruz is indeed pro-life.  Many women are pro-life.  Ted Cruz being pro-life does not mean he is anti-woman.  It is a ridiculous argument to imply or make.  Cecile Richards does not speak on behalf of the entirety of her gender.  To advocate that she does speak for all women, is ridiculous as well.    

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