E.U.’s ‘bananas’ star chamber

The E.U.'s "bananas" Belgium overlords

The E.U.’s “bananas” Belgium overlords

At the local IHOP flaky Belgium waffles are great. Belgium is also great for the fictional. For example, Agatha Christie’s eccentric mustached gumshoe Hercule Poirot was so beloved he was commemorated with a real obituary in The New York Times. What is not great is The Council (the appointed European Union’s dictatorial decision-making authority) or The Commission (its Big Brother right arm enforcer) of this one world, globalist organization. To make matters even more cumbersome, on certain issues The Council shares legislative power with the European Parliament (the two institutions act jointly on budgetary matters). However, by treaty, the 751 member European Parliament can only meet in full session—not in Brussels, Belgium—but in Strasbourg, France. Recall that Europe is in an economic crisis (read: Greece). Therefore, member states have imposed harsh austerity measures (including slashing pay for government employees). Still, one week per month some 10,000 people—a small army of legislators and support staff including lobbyists and journalists—make the 550 mile round trip trek. The actual purpose of these 4-day conferences is paid vacations. They don’t propose new legislation: only rubber stamp the mandates of The Council. What is the cost of maintaining two parliamentary seats? A mere pittance: estimated at $200 million per year.
 
In 2014, British newspaper The Telegraph uncovered the E.U.’s monkey business. Apparently E.U. officials pay special, minimal tax rates. And—oh, by the way—many mid-level employees have more take home pay than British Prime Minister David Cameron. Riddle me this: what do monkeys eat, why does the E.U. meet? Answer: To set guidelines that bananas should be “free from malformation or abnormal curvature.” With Brexit’s successful referendum (read: buyer’s remorse) at 51.9%, that’s obviously one Orwellian banana peel too far—for the slight majority anyway. (Yet, what’s amazing is the brainwashed 48.1% voting to remain. This virtual 50/50 political trend rather reminds one of ultra-constitutional Barack Obama’s inflated approval numbers.)
 
In eras past, Great Britain ruled the world. That’s the basis of the famous saying: “The sun never set on the British Empire.” Any people that can do that, can certainly self-govern in the 21st century. Therefore, they are entitled to their famous tolerance for all “bendy” things. In any case, Britons don’t need corrupt foreign overlords telling them how bent their fruits should be.

David L. Hunter is an Associate Editor at Capitol Hill Outsider.”  He’s on Twitter and blogs at davidlhunter.blogspot.com.  He is published in The Washington PostThe Washington Times, “FrontPage Mag,” and extensively in Patriot Post,” Canada Free Press” and American Thinker.”

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