Sessions, not Ryan, Would be the Sensible Pick of a Brokered Convention

I have long believed that there is a global power elite that manipulates the political process to its advantage. This strikes me as a “no duh” assertion. What separates me from some of my more conspiratorial brethren, is that I don’t believe this power elite is omnipotent. They cannot foresee or control for every contingency. The success of Donald Trump’s campaign is one such contingency they didn’t foresee, and the rather ham-handed way they have responded to it demonstrates that the conspiracy is not all powerful.

The Powers That Be assumed Jeb Bush would coast to the Republican nomination, but they were OK with Marco Rubio or John Kasich or Scott Walker or whichever other cookie cutter Republican (with the arguable exceptions of Ted Cruz and Rand Paul) winning the nomination because none of them fundamentally challenge the current reigning globalist paradigm. That is one way the Powers That Be work. They limit the range of acceptable choices so their paradigm is safe regardless of the outcome.

Now, because the donor class couldn’t get their act together and figure out how to derail Trump earlier, they are stuck with throwing everything but the kitchen sink at him while rallying behind the less than ideal, from their standpoint, Ted Cruz, to stop a Trump nomination, with the ultimate hope of forcing a brokered convention from which a more acceptable nominee will be chosen.

While this scenario is not totally implausible, if it happens it will not go down easily and will leave the Republican Party seriously fractured. The elites don’t really care about this because they are fine with a Hillary Clinton Presidency, but presumably all the would-be conservatives who are helping them out with their plan by rallying around Cruz would care.

Despite not conceding that the power elite conspiracy is all powerful, I have previously assumed that you don’t get to be part of the elite by accident, so I figured they were at least intelligent. I’m beginning to wonder about that.

Why do I wonder? The name most often suggested as the fresh new candidate that could arise from a brokered convention is Paul Ryan. Are you kidding me? Paul Ryan is precisely what is wrong with the current Establishment GOP that this election is a repudiation of. He is pro-amnesty, pro-mass legal immigration, pro-fast track and pro-TPP. He just rolled over on the budget deal with Obama greatly angering the party base, and has even drawn a credible primary challenger. In other words, he is a perfect donor class stooge. You couldn’t create a better caricature of one if you tried. It’s like the Establishment hasn’t been paying attention to what has been going on this campaign season at all if they are so clueless as to think Paul Ryan is the answer. Either that, or they just intend to flex their muscle and demonstrate their power by forcing on the GOP their puppet regardless of the consequences.

Far be it from me to give the Establishment advice, but the main divide remaining in the Republican electorate this season is roughly between the newly mobilized populist nationalist forces represented by Trump, and more orthodox movement type conservatives who are now rallying around Cruz. If the Establishment is really interested in finding a consensus candidate, it will find someone who can bridge these gaps and appeal to both sides, rather than force a donor class lackey like Ryan on the Party. Trump’s message on trade and immigration is a direct repudiation of the Ryan wing of the Party, and Cruz, however sincere, has also now embraced a hard line on immigration and TPP. Ryan does not unify these factions. He carries water for the global elite.

There aren’t a lot of options that could satisfy both sides because most national level elected Republicans echo movement conservative orthodoxy to a greater or lesser degree, but one name does come immediately to mind, Sen. Jeff Sessions. Sessions has always been rock solid on immigration, the best in the Senate on the issue. He hasn’t always been solid on trade deals, but he seems to have come around on the issue. He expressed skepticism of the Korean trade deal, but voted for it. But he vocally opposed fast-track for TPP and opposes TPP. His rhetoric on trade seems to have shifted as well, perhaps influenced by his advisor, now on loan to Trump, Stephen Miller. In addition to being satisfactory to the Trump faction on immigration and TPP, Sessions also checks all the conservative boxes and avoids some of Trump’s heterodoxies in a way that would satisfy the more orthodox conservative Cruz supporters.

I am still a Trump supporter and am not advocating this option, I’m just suggesting that if the Powers That Be are intent on foisting a fresh face off on the Party through a brokered convention, maybe they should get serious about finding someone who could actually bridge gaps and unite the party, rather than an Establishment lickspittle like Paul Ryan.

Also published at the Fleming Foundation website and The Economic Populist.

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